Short Information about OpenTodoList
Image source: Pixabay

Stay Organized

Organize todo lists, notes and images in libraries. Create e.g. a library for personal use and one for work. In addition, you can tag items inside a library, which allow you to easily break down larger collections into smaller parts.

Sync Your Data With NextCloud, ownCloud and More

OpenTodoList allows you to synchronize your libraries with NextCloud, ownCloud and other WebDAV enabled web storage servers. In addition, as libraries are basically just a set of folders and files, you can use any third party synchronization tool of your choice.

Your Data is Yours

We do not restrict the cloud platforms your can use to synchronize data. We have support for some platforms like NextCloud or ownCloud, which you can easily host yourself on your own or trusted hardware. In addition, you can opt to create libraries just locally e.g. on your laptop - there’s no better way to prevent confidential information to leak.

For Desktops and Mobiles

OpenTodoList is designed to run on both Desktop Operating Systems like Linux, macOS and Windows as well as mobile ones like Android.

We’re in October, and besides 👻 Halloween 👻 you’re probably waiting for an update of OpenTodoList, don’t ya? Now, here it comes!

Changelog

  • rpdev/opentodolist#470: OpenTodoList recently got the ability to move and copy items around. To make this more convenient, we introduced (alphabetical) ordering of items when selecting a target parent item for such an operation.
  • rpdev/opentodolist#478: This is a quite technical issue, but still… up to now, we used a quite dated signing scheme for the Android deliveries. This is a thing if the past now - although ideally, most of you never will notice a difference 😉
  • rpdev/opentodolist#479: On macOS, the application menu was not properly translated. Although there is in general not much to see (the app doesn’t currently use that menu…) this still makes it more consistent of you’re on a non-English system.
  • rpdev/opentodolist#465: Talking about translations… there was a bug that caused the app to not properly take up the system language, so you instead had to manually switch the language in the settings. The bug showed up at least on iOS and macOS, but probably also could manifest on other systems. No matter, fixed with this release ✅
  • rpdev/opentodolist#471: This is an important one… OpenTodoList currently uses WebDAV for its built-in synchronization. The good thing is: WebDAV is a standard protocol with lots of servers implementing it (e.g. many email providers make online storage available via that protocol). The bad thing is… a lot of these implementations are not fully standards compliant. This caused issues with the sync. In this release, we beefed up the handling of such faulty servers, making the sync more robust. It might still not work in 100% of all cases, but the app should be usable now with many more servers out there. Please note, that if you already have added one or more accounts in your app, you have to either re-add them or edit them - pressing that OK button in the account settings will trigger a test against the server, which is required to detect faulty behavior and activate the necessary local workarounds in the app.

Downloads

  • Please find the download links for major platforms on GitHub.
  • For Android, the release is available via Google Play.
  • For iOS, the release is available via the App Store.
  • If you use snap, you can install the app from the snapcraft.io.
  • If you use flatpak, you can install the app from Flathub.
  • For Arch based Linux distributions, you can install the app from AUR.

Known Issues

There are currently no known issues. If you encounter any issues, please file a bug report in the bug tracker.

We just released a new bug fix release of OpenTodoList. Here’s the list of fixes included:

Changelog

  • rpdev/opentodolist#445: On Windows, when running the uninstaller, we now ensure that the app gets terminated. This is especially important during updates. The installer first calls the uninstaller to remove the previous version. If the app continues running in the background, the installation will run into issues (complaining that the app executable cannot be written). Note that the fix will get effective only after the update, i.e. for current installations, you have to make sure the app is not running manually.
  • rpdev/opentodolist#469: We added an option to the CMake build to select the Qt version to build against. This is important on systems, where both Qt5 and Qt6 are installed in parallel.
  • rpdev/opentodolist#451: We ironed out a bug where source code in the notes of an item would not wrap at the end of the line.
  • rpdev/opentodolist#473: Last but not least, there was a bug which sneaked in with the UI refactoring we recently made, which rendered the confirmation dialog to delete all completed items in a list unusable.

Downloads

  • Please find the download links for major platforms on GitHub.
  • For Android, the release is available via Google Play.
  • For iOS, the release is available via the App Store.
  • If you use snap, you can install the app from the snapcraft.io.
  • If you use flatpak, you can install the app from Flathub.
  • For Arch based Linux distributions, you can install the app from AUR.

Known Issues

There are currently no known issues. If you encounter any issues, please file a bug report in the bug tracker.

Usually, we’re reporting here about new releases of OpenTodoList. However, this time, we have something different to share: We will change the cadence and mode of releases of the app.

Some Background First…

After some rather unsteady development in the first years, OpenTodoList reached a stable state in 2017. And since then, we usually created one release each month.

This is a great way of releasing as it ensures new features get available as early as possible to users. However, there’s not a large development team behind the app. In fact, the main development is done by a single person. These monthly releases hence were a bit troublesome from time to time:

  • First of all, creating a “proper” release costs some time. Over the past years, we’ve automated a lot, but still, each minor release we pushed out since OpenTodoList reached version v3.0 also involved quite some manual effort.
  • Another thing: Having only a window of approximately a month can be a bit challenging, especially when implementing larger changes. We’ve seen this well recently, when some refactoring was done in the user interface part of the app. Due to the one month window barely leaves time for proper beta testing, quite some issues sneaked in, which is annoying for users.

Switching to Quarterly Releases

To tackle the above mentioned issues, we decided to switch to another release scheme for the app:

There will be a minor release every quarter. The next scheduled release is v3.38, which is scheduled for end of September. The next release v3.39 will then be released end of December, v3.40 end of March 2022, and so on…

With this, we’ll have more time to work on (also larger) features and test them more carefully before pushing out a new version to our users. This also will reduce the overhead for as for creating new releases, as this will happen only every 3 months now.

Open Beta Testing

For those of you wanting the most recent features as soon as possible, we’ll also improve the documentation on how to participate in beta testing. In fact, on a lot of platforms and distributions of the app (including iOS, Android, Flatpak and Snap), you can already today easily test out intermediate builds without waiting for an official release to happen. We’ll gather the required information on how to do so in the next days. And also, we’ll look into how to enable beta testing for other platforms and distribution channels of the app.

Intermediate Bug Fix Releases

In the past, when we got reports of critical issues, we sometimes pushed out a bug fix release. However, most bug fixes were not relevant enough to push them out via a dedicated release. Instead, they were part of the next regular minor release.

Of course, with the new release cadence, this would mean you have to wait for up to three months for a fix to an issue you reported - which is definitely something we don’t want to have, either. So, we’ll also push out bug fix releases on a more regular basis. However, to keep overhead low, these bug fix releases might happen more silently and also - depending on the bug - scoped: For example, if there’s a bug which affects only a specific operating system or a specific distribution channel, we might create a dedicated release for this, not pushing out new builds on all platforms as we did before.

Conclusion

With these changes, we hope to further improve the overall stability of the app, making it more reliable for “business critical” tasks while also enabling a quick way to test new versions of the app without having to wait too long.

As always, after larger changes, the chances are high that one or the other bug sneaks in 🐜

This is also true for v3.37 of OpenTodoList, so we’ll today release v3.37.1 to fix those issues.

Changelog

  • rpdev/opentodolist#472: In the previous release, it was not possible to add new accounts 😱 This is particularly bad for new users (existing users of the app probably wouldn’t even have noticed). Still, this is a super important thing to get fixed!
  • rpdev/opentodolist#467: Another very bad bug that needed to get ironed out. The main window of the app would not show up on Windows. This, as well, is fixed in this release.

Downloads

  • Please find the download links for major platforms on GitHub.
  • For Android, the release is available via Google Play.
  • For iOS, the release is available via the App Store.
  • If you use snap, you can install the app from the snapcraft.io.
  • If you use flatpak, you can install the app from Flathub.
  • For Arch based Linux distributions, you can install the app from AUR.

Known Issues

There are currently no known issues. If you encounter any issues, please file a bug report in the bug tracker.

August, summer time and - of course - time for another release of OpenTodoList!

We have to admit, also this months list of changes is not too long. This is partly because there was only limited free time we could spend on the app. And partly, because we started something brand new (if you are curious: Head over to GitLab, there you can find the new project’s sources already - fancy images and a separate website are coming soon, promised).

Anyway, its still worth a new iteration of OpenTodoList, so let’s have a look what made it in this time:

Changelog

  • rpdev/opentodolist#455: OpenTodoList is now around for several years. In this time, there was a lot ongoing also in the underlying framework the app is built upon (which is Qt and QML for writing the user interface). In this release, we took the time to clean up a bit in our GUI code. For you, this should vastly be transparent. The most notable change is, that we switched to Google’s Material Design Icons (previously, we used FontAwesome, which, however, became a bit more difficult to use in non Web Apps in recent versions).
  • rpdev/opentodolist#458: Another minor change is, that the app now targets Android 11 by default. This is more a technical thingy and shouldn’t bother you too much, either. Still, this is the house keeping that we have to do as well 🧹

Downloads

  • Please find the download links for major platforms on GitHub.
  • For Android, the release is available via Google Play.
  • For iOS, the release is available via the App Store.
  • If you use snap, you can install the app from the snapcraft.io.
  • If you use flatpak, you can install the app from Flathub.
  • For Arch based Linux distributions, you can install the app from AUR.

Known Issues

There are currently no known issues. If you encounter any issues, please file a bug report in the bug tracker.